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MV Joyita

MV Joyita was a merchant vessel from which 25 passengers and crew mysteriously disappeared in the South Pacific in October 1955. She was found adrift with no one aboard. The ship was in very poor condition, with corroded pipes and a radio which, ...

Disappearance of Maureen Kelly

Maureen Kelly is an American woman who disappeared on the evening of June 9, 2013 at the Canyon Creek Campground, located in Gifford Pinchot National Forest in Skamania County, Washington. According to a group of friends who were at the campgroun ...

Lasseter's Reef

Lasseters Reef refers to the purported discovery, announced by Harold Bell Lasseter in 1929 and 1930, of a fabulously rich gold deposit in a remote and desolate corner of central Australia. Lasseters accounts of the find are conflicting and its p ...

Lost Cosmonauts

The Lost Cosmonauts or Phantom Cosmonauts are subjects of a conspiracy theory alleging that Soviet cosmonauts went to outer space before Yuri Gagarin, but their existence has never been publicly acknowledged by either the Soviet or Russian space ...

Mad Gasser of Mattoon

The Mad Gasser of Mattoon was the name given to the person or people believed to be responsible for a series of apparent gas attacks that occurred in Mattoon, Illinois, during the mid-1940s. More than two dozen separate cases of gassings were rep ...

Man in the Iron Mask

The Man in the Iron Mask was an unidentified prisoner who was arrested in 1669 or 1670 and subsequently held in a number of French prisons, including the Bastille and the Fortress of Pignerol. He was held in the custody of the same jailer, Benign ...

Managua event

The Managua event was an explosion that was widely reported as a possible meteorite fall on 6 September 2014 in Managua, Nicaragua, near the Augusto C. Sandino International Airport runway. However, exactly what caused it remains undetermined. Wi ...

Mary Celeste

Mary Celeste was an American merchant brigantine discovered adrift and deserted in the Atlantic Ocean off the Azores Islands on December 4, 1872. The Canadian brigantine Dei Gratia found her in a dishevelled but seaworthy condition under partial ...

Max Headroom broadcast signal intrusion

On the evening of November 22, 1987, two television stations in Chicago, Illinois in the United States had their broadcast signals hijacked in an act described as video piracy, featuring an unknown person wearing a Max Headroom mask and costume. ...

Mayerling incident

The Mayerling incident is the series of events surrounding the apparent murder–suicide of Rudolf, Crown Prince of Austria and his lover, Baroness Mary Vetsera. Rudolf, who was married to Princess Stephanie of Belgium, was the only son of Emperor ...

London Monster

The London Monster was the name given to an alleged attacker of women in London between 1788 and 1790. The attacker had a signature behaviour of piquerism, the pricking or stabbing of victims with a knife, pin or needle.

Moscow hostage crisis chemical agent

The chemical agent used in the Moscow theatre hostage crisis of 23 October 2002 has never been definitively revealed by the Russian authorities, though many possible identities have been speculated. An undisclosed incapacitating agent was used by ...

Estelle Mouzin affair

The Estelle Mouzin case is a French criminal case which began on 9 January 2003 with the disappearance of Estelle Mouzin in the city of Guermantes in France. Estelle Mouzin was a nine-year-old girl who was returning from school when she disappeared.

Mr. & Mrs. jokes

A Mr. and Mrs. joke is an originally French type of joke, which takes the form of a riddle giving the surname of a husband and wife and asking for their childs given name, the answer forming a pun when combined with the surname. For example:

Juanita Nielsen

Juanita Joan Nielsen was an Australian newspaper owner, journalist and heiress, who was notable for her activism for urban conservation and community issues–particularly anti-development campaigns. She disappeared in Kings Cross, Sydney in early ...

Solomon Northup

Solomon Northup was an American abolitionist and the primary author of the memoir Twelve Years a Slave. A free-born African American from New York, he was the son of a freed slave and a free woman of color. A farmer and a professional violinist, ...

Patomskiy crater

Patomskiy crater or Patom crater, also known as Конус Колпакова, Konus Kolpakova "Kolpakov cone") or "Fire Eagle Nest" is a peculiar rock formation located in the Bodaibo District of the Irkutsk region of southeastern Siberia, 360 kilometres from ...

Phaistos Disc

The Phaistos Disc is a disk of fired clay from the Minoan palace of Phaistos on the island of Crete, possibly dating to the middle or late Minoan Bronze Age. The disk is about 15 cm in diameter and covered on both sides with a spiral of stamped s ...

Death of JonBenet Ramsey

JonBenet Patricia Ramsey was an American child beauty queen who was killed at the age of 6 in her familys home in Boulder, Colorado. A lengthy handwritten ransom note was found in the house. Her father John found the girls body in the basement of ...

Rohonc Codex

The Rohonc Codex is an illustrated manuscript book by an unknown author, with a text in an unknown language and writing system, that surfaced in Hungary in the early 19th century. The books origin and the meaning of the text and illustrations hav ...

Roman dodecahedron

A Roman dodecahedron is a small hollow object made of bronze or stone, with a dodecahedral shape: twelve flat pentagonal faces, each face having a circular hole of varying diameter in the middle, the holes connecting to the hollow center. Roman d ...

Charley Ross

Charles Brewster Charley Ross was the primary victim of the first American kidnapping for ransom to receive widespread media coverage. His fate remains unknown, and his case is one of the most famous disappearances in US history.

Seattle windshield pitting epidemic

The Seattle windshield pitting epidemic is a phenomenon which affected Bellingham, Seattle, and other communities of Washington State in April, 1954; it is considered an example of a mass delusion. It was characterized by widespread observation o ...

Shark Arm case

The Shark Arm case refers to a series of incidents that began in Sydney, Australia, on 25 April 1935 when a human arm was regurgitated by a captive 3.5-metre tiger shark, subsequently leading to a murder investigation and trial.

Shugborough inscription

The Shugborough Inscription is a sequence of letters – O U O S V A V V, between the letters D M – carved on the 18th-century Shepherds Monument in the grounds of Shugborough Hall in Staffordshire, England, below a mirror image of Nicolas Poussins ...

Silkhenge

Silkhenge structures are a means of spider reproduction used by one or more currently-unknown species of spider. It typically consists of a central "spire" constructed of spider silk, containing one to two eggs, surrounded by a sort of fence of s ...

Count of St. Germain

"Count Saint-Germain" redirects here. Also see St. Germain Theosophy. For other uses of St. Germain see Saint-Germain disambiguation. The Comte de Saint Germain was a European adventurer, with an interest in science, alchemy and the arts. He achi ...

The Starving of Saqqara

The Starving of Saqqara is the name given to a statue of suspected Pre-dynastic Egyptian origins. The statue, of two nude beings with large skulls and thin bodies, seated, also has writing on the back of one of the figures that has yet to be iden ...

Stuxnet

Stuxnet is a malicious computer worm, first uncovered in 2010, thought to have been in development since at least 2005. Stuxnet targets supervisory control and data acquisition systems and is believed to be responsible for causing substantial dam ...

El Tapado

El Tapado was a mysterious person who arrived in New Spain in 1683, claiming to be visitor general and governor of the colony, and governor of the castle of Acapulco, appointed by the Court in Spain. El Tapado disembarked at Veracruz on May 22, 1 ...

Texarkana Moonlight Murders

The Texarkana Moonlight Murders, a term coined by the news media, were a series of unsolved murders and other violent crimes committed in and around Texarkana in the spring of 1946 by an unidentified serial killer known as the "Phantom Killer" or ...

Tomb of Alexander the Great

The location of the tomb of Alexander the Great is an enduring mystery. Shortly after Alexanders death in Babylon, the possession of his body became a subject of negotiations between Perdiccas, Ptolemy I Soter, and Seleucus I Nicator. According t ...

Tomb of Genghis Khan

Marco Polo wrote that, even by the late 13th century, the Mongols did not know the location of the tomb. The Secret History of the Mongols has the year of Genghis Khans death but no information concerning his burial. In the "Travels of Marco Polo ...

Toynbee tiles

The Toynbee tiles are messages of unknown origin found embedded in asphalt of streets in about two dozen major cities in the United States and four South American cities. Since the 1980s, several hundred tiles have been discovered. They are gener ...

Unfavorable Semicircle

Unfavorable Semicircle is the name of a series of channels on YouTube which garnered attention for the high volume and unusual nature of the videos they published. The BBC has referred to Unfavorable Semicircle as "YouTubes strangest mystery". Un ...

Utsuro-bune

Utsuro-bune, also Utsuro-fune, and Urobune, refers to an unknown object that allegedly washed ashore in 1803 in Hitachi province on the eastern coast of Japan. When defining Utsuro-bune, the bune part means "boat" while Utsuro means empty, or hol ...

Vela incident

The Vela incident, also known as the South Atlantic Flash, was an unidentified double flash of light detected by an American Vela Hotel satellite on 22 September 1979 near the Prince Edward Islands in the Indian Ocean. The cause of the flash rema ...

Voynich manuscript

The Voynich manuscript is an illustrated codex hand-written in an unknown writing system. The vellum on which it is written has been carbon-dated to the early 15th century, and it may have been composed in Italy during the Italian Renaissance. Th ...

Who put Bella in the Wych Elm?

Who put Bella in the Wych Elm? is graffiti which first appeared in 1944 following the 1943 discovery of the skeletonised remains of a woman by four children inside a wych elm in Hagley Wood, Hagley, in Worcestershire, England. The victim - whose ...

Wow! signal

The Wow! signal was a strong narrowband radio signal received on August 15, 1977, by Ohio State Universitys Big Ear radio telescope in the United States, then used to support the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The signal appeared to co ...

Year Without a Summer

The year 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer because of severe climate abnormalities that caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C. This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere. Evidence suggests ...

YOGTZE case

The YOGTZE case refers to the death of unemployed German food engineer Gunther Stoll, which occurred on 26 October 1984. It is one of the most mysterious unsolved cases in German criminal history.

Procedural knowledge

Procedural knowledge, also known as imperative knowledge, is the knowledge exercised in the performance of some task. See below for the specific meaning of this term in cognitive psychology and intellectual property law. In some legal systems, su ...

Batoning

Batoning is the technique of cutting or splitting wood by using a baton-sized stick or mallet to repeatedly strike the spine of a sturdy knife, chisel or blade in order to drive it through wood, similar to how a froe is used. The batoning method ...

Campfire

A campfire is a fire at a campsite that provides light and warmth, and heat for cooking. It can also serve as a beacon, and an insect and predator deterrent. Established campgrounds often provide a stone or steel fire ring for safety. Campfires a ...

The Chariton Collector

The Chariton Collector was a local history and folklore magazine published biannually between 1980 and 1989 by students at Kirksville High School, Kirksville, Missouri. The magazine took its name from the Chariton River, which flows through north ...

Foxfire (magazine)

The Foxfire magazine began in 1966, written and published as a quarterly American magazine by students at Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School, a private secondary education school located in the U.S. state of Georgia. At the time Foxfire began, Rabun Gap ...

Haynes Manual

The Haynes Owners Workshop Manuals are a series of practical manuals from the British publisher Haynes Publishing Group. The series primarily focuses upon the maintenance and repair of automotive vehicles, covering a wide range of makes and model ...

How-to

A how-to is an informal and often short video or text describing how to accomplish a specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts and consequently may leave out details that are important only to experts. Due to this, a how-to may ...

Outdoor cooking

Outdoor cooking differs substantially from kitchen-based cooking, the most obvious difference being lack of an easily defined kitchen area. As a result, campers and backpackers have developed a significant body of techniques and specialized equip ...