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Edict

An edict is a decree or announcement of a law, often associated with monarchism, but it can be under any official authority. Synonyms include dictum and pronouncement. Edict derives from the Latin edictum. In the late 1e of law".

Enacted law

Enacted law is the body of a law adopted by the people or legislative bodies. It includes: Regulations passed by administrative bodies that have the force of law. Statutes ordinances/laws passed by legislative bodies, and; Constitutions as adopte ...

Initiative

In political science, an initiative is a means by which a petition signed by a certain minimum number of registered voters can force a government to choose to either enact a law or hold a public vote in parliament in what is called indirect initi ...

Kuching Declaration

The Kuching Declaration is a declaration in English was adopted by the three component parties of the Pakatan Rakyat signed by Anwar Ibrahim and Baru Bian, Democratic Action Party signed by Lim Kit Siang and Wong Ho Leng, Pan-Malaysian Islamic Pa ...

Ministerial order

A ministerial decree or ministerial order is a decree by a ministry. With a ministerial decree the administrative department is delegated the task to impose a formal judgement or mandate. Ministerial decrees are usually imposed under the authorit ...

Motu proprio

In law, motu proprio describes an official act taken without a formal request from another party. Some jurisdictions use the term sua sponte for the same concept. In Catholic canon law, it refers to a document issued by the pope on his own initia ...

People's Initiative

Peoples Initiative is a common appellative in the Philippines that refers to either a mode for constitutional amendment provided by the 1987 Philippine Constitution or to the act of pushing an initiative allowed by the Philippine Initiative and R ...

Precedent

In common law legal systems, precedent is a principle or rule established in a previous legal case that is either binding on or persuasive for a court or other tribunal when deciding subsequent cases with similar issues or facts. Common-law legal ...

Rulemaking

In administrative law, rule-making is the process that executive and independent agencies use to create, or promulgate, regulations. In general, legislatures first set broad policy mandates by passing statutes, then agencies create more detailed ...

Treaty

A treaty is a formal written agreement entered into by actors in international law, namely sovereign states and international organizations. A treaty may also be known as an international agreement, protocol, covenant, convention, pact, or exchan ...

Law School Admission Test

The Law School Admission Test is a half-day standardized test administered seven times each year at designated testing centers throughout the world. The Law School Admission Council administers the LSAT for prospective law school candidates. It i ...

Legal Education Eligibility Test

The Legal Education Eligibility Test is an examination which will be administered by the Korea Institute of Curriculum and Evaluation, intended to provide law schools in the Republic of Korea an evaluation metric to measure reading and reasoning ...

National Admissions Test for Law

The National Admissions Test for Law, or LNAT, is an admissions aptitude test that was adopted in 2004 by eight UK university law programmes as an admissions requirement for home applicants. The test was established at the leading urgency of Oxfo ...

Acceleration (law)

In American law, it usually appears within the context of what is known as an "acceleration clause" to a contract. This is a clause that requires payment in full of a contract if certain conditions occur. Another concept that involves acceleratio ...

Acceptance of responsibility

Acceptance of responsibility is a provision in the United States Federal Sentencing Guidelines providing for a decrease by 2 or 3 levels in offenders offense level for admitting guilt and otherwise demonstrating behavior consistent with acceptanc ...

Acknowledgment (law)

In law, an acknowledgment is a declaration or avowal of ones own act, used to authenticate legal instruments, which may give the instrument legal validity, and works to prevent the recording of false instruments or fraudulent executions. Acknowle ...

Acting (law)

In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean that the position has not yet been formally created, the person is only occupying the position temporarily to ensure continuity, or the person does not have a mandate. It can als ...

Actual notice

Actual notice is a law term, used most frequently in civil procedure. It is notice delivered in such a way as to give legally sufficient assurance that actual knowledge of the matter has been conveyed to the recipient.that is, physically handing ...

Additur

An additur is a legal term referring to the practice of a trial judge adding damages additional to the original amount awarded by the jury. It is not allowed in U.S. federal courts, as held by Dimick vs. Schiedt, 293 U.S. 474. However, Dimick was ...

Adjustment (law)

Adjust: When applied to a liquidated demand, the verb "adjust" has the same meaning as the word "settle" in the same connection, and means to pay the demand. When applied to an unliquidated demand, it means to ascertain the amount due or to settl ...

Adverse

In property law, adverse possession refers to an interest in real property which is contrary to the in-fact owner of the property. For example, an easement may permit some amount of access to property which might otherwise constitute a trespass.

Adverse inference

Adverse inference is a legal inference, adverse to the concerned party, drawn from silence or absence of requested evidence. It is part of evidence codes based on common law in various countries. According to Lawvibe, "the adverse inference can b ...

Adverse party

An adverse party is an opposing party in a lawsuit under an adversary system of law. In general, an adverse party is a party against whom judgment is sought or "a party interested in sustaining a judgment or decree." For example, the adverse part ...

Affreightment

Affreightment is a legal term used in shipping. A contract of affreightment is a contract between a ship-owner and a charterer, in which the ship-owner agrees to carry goods for the charterer in the ship, or to give the charterer the use of the w ...

After-acquired property

The term "after-acquired property" also arises in the context of bankruptcy, secured transactions, and the law of wills. In this context, "after-acquired property" is simply property which is acquired by a borrower after a security agreement is s ...

Age of candidacy

Age of candidacy is the minimum age at which a person can legally qualify to hold certain elected government offices. In many cases, it also determines the age at which a person may be eligible to stand for an election or be granted ballot access ...

Agreement in principle

In law, an agreement in principle is a stepping stone to a contract. Such agreements with regard to the principle are usually considered fair and equitable. Even if not all details are known, an agreement in principle may, for example, outline a ...

Allegation

In law, an allegation is a claim of a fact by a party in a pleading, charge, or defense. Until they can be proved, allegations remain merely assertions. There are also marital allegations: marriage bonds and allegations exist for couples who appl ...

Allonge

An allonge is a slip of paper affixed to a negotiable instrument, as a bill of exchange, for the purpose of receiving additional endorsements for which there may not be sufficient space on the bill itself. An endorsement written on the allonge is ...

Ambiguity (law)

In contract law, ambiguity is a situation in which the terms of a contract have multiple definitions or refer to multiple subjects. Patent ambiguity and latent ambiguity differ in what situation led to the ambiguity existing and therefore the typ ...

Ampliative

Ampliative, a term used mainly in logic, meaning "extending" or "adding to that which is already known". In Norman law, an "ampliation" was a postponement of a sentence in order to obtain further evidence.

Angary

Angary ") is the name given to the right of a belligerent to seize and apply for the purposes of war any kind of property on belligerent territory, including that which may belong to subjects or citizens of a neutral state. Article 53 of the Regu ...

Antedated

An antedated contract is a contract whose date is in the past; formally, a contract where the effective date on the contract is prior to the date on which the contract is executed. The term is from Latin ante meaning "before", and its antonym is ...

Appearance (law)

In law, appearance is the coming into court of either of the parties to a lawsuit, and/or the formal act by which a defendant submits himself to the jurisdiction of the court.

Appearance of impropriety

The appearance of impropriety is a phrase referring to a situation which to a layperson without knowledge of the specific circumstances might seem to raise ethics questions. For instance, although a person might regularly and reliably collect mon ...

Apportionment

The legal term apportionment means distribution or allotment in proper shares. It is a term used in law in a variety of senses. Sometimes it is employed roughly and has no technical meaning; this indicates the distribution of a benefit e.g. salva ...

Arbitrariness

Arbitrariness is the quality of being "determined by chance, whim, or impulse, and not by necessity, reason, or principle". It is also used to refer to a choice made without any specific criterion or restraint. Arbitrary decisions are not necessa ...

Arbitration

Arbitration, a form of alternative dispute resolution, is a way to resolve disputes outside the courts. The dispute will be decided by one or more persons, which renders the "arbitration award". An arbitration award is legally binding on both sid ...

Arraignment

Arraignment is a formal reading of a criminal charging document in the presence of the defendant to inform the defendant of the charges against the defendant. In response to arraignment, the accused is expected to enter a plea. Acceptable pleas v ...

As is

As is, when employed as a term with legal effect, is used to disclaim some implied warranties for an item being sold. Certain types of implied warranties must be specifically disclaimed, such as the implied warranty of title. "As is" denotes that ...

Back-bond

Back-bond, or back-letter, in Scots law, is a deed qualifying the terms of another deed, or declaratory of the purposes for which another deed has been granted. Thus an ex facie absolute disposition, qualified by a back-bond expressing the limite ...

Beneficiary

A beneficiary in the broadest sense is a natural person or other legal entity who receives money or other benefits from a benefactor. For example, the beneficiary of a life insurance policy is the person who receives the payment of the amount of ...

Bodily harm

Bodily harm is a legal term of art used in the definition of both statutory and common law offences in Australia, Canada, England and Wales and other common law jurisdictions. It is a synonym for injury or bodily injury and similar expressions, t ...

Cause celebre

A cause celebre is an issue or incident arousing widespread controversy, outside campaigning, and heated public debate. The term continues in the media in all senses. It is sometimes used positively for celebrated legal cases for their precedent ...

Cause of death

In law, medicine, and statistics, cause of death is an official determination of conditions resulting in a humans death, which may be recorded on a death certificate. A cause of death is determined by a medical examiner. The cause of death is a s ...

Cease and desist

A cease and desist letter is a document sent to an individual or business to stop purportedly illegal activity and not to restart it. The letter may warn that if the recipient does not discontinue specified conduct, or take certain actions, by de ...

Cestui que

Cestui que is a shortened version of cestui a que use le feoffment fuit fait, literally, "The person for whose benefit the feoffment was made." It is a Law French phrase of medieval English invention, which appears in the legal phrases cestui que ...

Champerty and maintenance

Champerty and maintenance are doctrines in common law jurisdictions that aim to preclude frivolous litigation: Champerty from Old French champart, a feudal lords share of produce is the "maintenance" of a person in a lawsuit on condition that the ...

Charge (youth)

During the European Middle Ages, a charge often meant an underage person placed under the supervision of a nobleman. Charges were the responsibility of the nobleman they were charged to, and they were usually expected to be treated as guests or a ...

Charging order

A charging order, in English law, is an order obtained from a court or judge by a judgment creditor, by which the property of the judgment debtor in any stocks or funds or land stands charged with the payment of the amount for which judgment shal ...