ⓘ Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo

                                     

ⓘ Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo

The Armadillo was designed in 1917 by Armstrong Whitworths new chief designer, Fred Murphy, as a private venture single-seat fighter powered by a Bentley BR2 rotary engine. While the design met the requirements of Air Board Specification A1a for a replacement for the Sopwith Camel, it was principally produced to test the abilities of Armstrong Whitworths new design team, and was not considered a serious competitor for the requirement. Despite this, Armstrong Whitworth was granted a licence in January 1918 to allow construction of two prototypes.

Aircraft were two-Bay biplane with a square cross-section of the fuselage. The engine in the nose was enclosed by a circular cowl with a deep hump above the cowl housing two.303 in 7.7 mm Vickers machine guns that fired through the propeller arc by means of synchronization gears.

The first prototype flew in April 1918. This type is not subject to the official assessment of the Ministry of aviation, with a bad view from the cockpit criticize. By the time the Armadillo appeared sopvich snipe, with the same engine and faster already in large scale production and Murphy began working on a more advanced wrestler Ara, so the Armadillo was abandoned, the second prototype was not completed.